May 152013
 

Today in my monoprinting class we went over the pronto plate technique. This is a little hard to explain, but basically it seems to be a way to get a complicated image onto a print – like a photograph, or a complex line drawing, something that would be hard to draw directly on your plate.

Another advantage is that once you get the pronto plate made up with your complex image, it acts like a lino block and can be inked over and over with different colors. But instead of being made of lino it’s actually a thin piece of paper and can even be cut up. As I said, complicated.

This is pronto plate cut up into strips. Actually I scavenged strips of pronto plates, put them together and drew on them.

This is pronto plate cut up into strips. Actually I scavenged strips of pronto plates, put them together and drew on them.

It’s hard to imagine, but these strips of paper (or pronto plate), once covered in a special water solution can be rolled with ink, and the ink will only stick to the black line, and not the white areas. You can then flop these onto a paper and print it.

I think the part of this that got me most excited was the fact that the plate could be cut up and the pieces moved around before printing. The end result is, yes, a similar concept to potato stamping, except that it would be really hard to carve a photograph of a face into a potato stamp.

Pronto plate experiments from Tess Martin on Vimeo.

¬†You can see in these experiments that I was trying to animate the face appearing, but have the strips be offset, so it’s only just discernible as a face. The possibilities are fun, but a bit head-scratchy too.

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